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Children of Hiroshima (原爆の子 Genbaku no Ko, lit. “Children of the Atomic Bomb”) also released as Atom-Bombed Children in Hiroshima,[1] is a 1952 Japanese feature film directed by Kaneto Shindo, a docudrama made with extreme emotions, having “the capacity to wound”.One may reasonably admit that fiction and documentary exist in equal parts in this film and that is why it may be considered a docufiction as well, an evidence that underlies the inseparable ethical and aesthetic motivations that gave rise to this film.[2][3][4]It was entered into the 1953 Cannes Film Festival

Takako Ishikawa (Nobuko Otowa) is a teacher on an island in the inland sea off the coast of Hiroshima after World War II. During her summer holiday, she goes back to Hiroshima to visit the graves of her parents and younger sister, who were killed in the bomb attack. She sees a beggar and realizes he is a man called Iwakichi (Osamu Takizawa) who used to work for her parents, now burned on the face and partially blind. She visits him at his home and asks about his family. His grandson, Tarō, is now in an institution. She visits the institution and finds the children barely have enough to eat. Takako offers to take Iwakichi and his grandson back to the island, but he refuses, running away.